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European Silverlight Hosting - HostForlIFE.eu :: Storing Files in SQL Server using WCF RIA Services and Silverlight

clock November 24, 2016 05:32 by author Scott

We have worked on several Silverlight Line of Business applications that require storing documents and files in a secure environment. There are several ways to accomplish this but one approach that has been successful for us is to store the documents using FILESTREAM Storage in SQL Server 2008. 

This is the first of three articles which will describe how you can create a Silverlight LOB application that stores and displays documents using FILESTREAM Storage in SQL Server 2008. 

1. Configuring FILESTREAM in your database and WCF RIA Services setup. 
2. Uploading and Saving files to the database from a Silverlight LOB application. 
3. Viewing files stored in the FILESTREAM from a Silverlight LOB application. 

Configuring FILESTREAM in you database

The first thing I would recommend is to read about FILESTREAM. Here is a tutorial which describes FILESTREAM. 

Okay, now that you read the entire white paper we are ready to roll! 

Setting up your database

Your database needs to enable FILESTREAM on the instance of the SQL Server Database Engine. 

Now that the FILESTREAM is enabled for the server you need to configure your database.

The basic steps include: 

1. Create a Filegroup of type Filestream

2. Create a File for the new Filestream Group

Now that your  database can handle FILESTREAM, the next is to create the SQL Tables that will store documents using the FILESTREAM. In this example I will be using three tables:

- File - storage for the document via the FILESTREAM
- Document - metadata about the File
- Folder - Virtual folder for the document

File table script

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[File]( [FileID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL, [DocumentFileId] [uniqueidentifier] ROWGUIDCOL NOT NULL, [DocumentFile] [varbinary](max) FILESTREAM NULL, CONSTRAINT [File_PK] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ( [FileID] ASC )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY] FILESTREAM_ON [FileStreamGroup1], UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED ( [DocumentFileId] ASC )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY] ) ON [PRIMARY] FILESTREAM_ON [FileStreamGroup1]

One thing we have found is that you only want to access the File table when you are ready to display the document. If you include this table in RIA Service Domain Service it will really slow things down—a lot. That is why we separated the metadata from the FILESTREAM into two tables - File and Document. 

Document table

You can add as many columns for metadata as needed for your project.  

A few things to notice:

1. This table contains a description and some metadata about the file. We use this table to bind a list of documents in a treeview or gridview control.
2. The guid field is used to create a second unique field. More to come on this in part 3.
3. Path will store the actual file name (e.g. MyDocument.pdf). We need this field so we can determine the type of file that is stored in the database (more on this in part 3).
4. FolderID points to a Folder table (see below). We use this table to organize documents in Folders.

Folder table

We use the ParentFolderID to enable nested folders.  

Okay, now our database is configured for FILESTREAM and we have the necessary tables to store documents. We are creating a Silverlight LOB application using WCF RIA Services, so assuming we already have our Silverlight project created our next steps will be:

1. Add/Update Entity Framework Entity Data Model (*.edmx) in the project. Include the File, Document, and Folder tables.
2. Add/Update Domain Service class and metadata for the three tables.

Tip - I like to include two methods when returning a Document. One that includes the File (i.e. Heavy version) and one that does not include the File (i.e. Lightweight version). This gives me flexibility on the client side. 

public Document GetDocumentById(int documentId) { return this.ObjectContext.Documents.Where(d => d.DocumentID == documentId).FirstOrDefault(); } public Document GetDocumentWithFileById(int documentId) { return this.ObjectContext.Documents.Include("File") .Where(d => d.DocumentID == documentId).FirstOrDefault(); }

To get a list of documents for a folder I use the following query. This can be bound to a gridview control. 

public IQueryable GetDocumentsByFolderId(int folderId) { return this.ObjectContext.Folders .Include("Document") .Where(f => f.FolderID == folderId).OrderByDescending(com => com.Document.CreatedDate); } 



European Silverlight 5 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Implement AutoComplete Text in Silverlight

clock October 5, 2016 23:59 by author Scott

Introduction

Silverlight is evolving with a lot of new features in each and every version release. The AutoComplete text feature is one such example. In this article I will demonstrate the implementation of the AutoComplete text feature in a Silverlight application. I will also create a sample Silverlight application to help explain the code. I have used Silverlight 4.0 and Visual Studio 2010 for developing the sample application.

AutoComplete Functionality

AutoComplete text functionality is not only a fancy effect but it's also a pretty useful feature from a user prospective and this feature is available in most of the latest applications. As the user enters text in a text box, a list of values gets populated and are listed in a similar fashion to that of a drop down based on the entered text. So the user is able to see the possible suggestions and can select a value from them or they also have the freedom to enter their own text as the base control is a textbox.

Some popular websites implementing the auto complete functionality are www.google.com,www.youtube.com, etc.,

Silverlight AutoCompleteBox Control

Implementing the autocomplete functionality in a Silverlight application is pretty straight forward because of the availability of the AutoCompleteBox control. This control is available in Silverlight 3.0 and higher versions. The developer only needs to set the ItemSource property of the AutoCompleteBox control with the value collection that is to be listed. The rest will be taken care by the control itself. 

Below are some of the useful settings that can be leveraged from the AutoCompleteBox control.

  1. FilterMode – Specifies the filter mode to display the data (StartsWith, Contains, Equals, etc.,)
  2. MinimumPrefixLength – Minimum prefix length for the auto complete feature to be triggered
  3. MaxDropDownHeight – Maximum height of the dropdown
  4. IsTextCompletionEnabled – If set to true then the first match found during the filtering process will be populated in the TextBox

 

Silverlight AutoCompleteBox Implementation

In this section we will create a sample Silverlight window implementing the autocomplete text feature. In the MainWindow.xaml add an AutoCompleteBox control and set the basic properties. Below is the code:

<UserControl xmlns:sdk="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/sdk"  
    x:Class="AutoCompleteBoxSample.MainPage"
    xmlns=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation
    xmlns:x=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml
    xmlns:d=http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="400">

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
        <Canvas>
            <sdk:Label Content="Enter the city: " Margin="46,76,264,198" />
            <sdk:AutoCompleteBox Height="28" H
orizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="142,77,0,0" FilterMode="StartsWith"
MinimumPrefixLength="1" MaxDropDownHeight="80" Name="autoCompleteBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="120"
Canvas.Left="-6" Canvas.Top="-5" />
        </Canvas>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

namespace AutoCompleteBoxSample
{
    public partial class MainPage : UserControl
    {
        List<string> _cities;

        public MainPage()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            autoCompleteBox1.ItemsSource = PopulateCities();
        }

        private IEnumerable PopulateCities()
        {
            _cities = new List<string>();
            _cities.Add("Boston");
            _cities.Add("Bangalore");
            _cities.Add("Birmingham");
            _cities.Add("Auckland");
            _cities.Add("Amsterdam");
            _cities.Add("Aspen");
            return _cities;
        }
    }
}

Run the application and you will see the figure below:

 

 

Using a DomainDataSource

In the above case we had the data directly in the application and it was hence hard-coded. In case if the data lies in the database, then the WCF RIA service and the DomainDataSource comes into play. Create a WCF RIA service and hook up the service to expose the data in the table through a generated data context method. Use a DomainDataSource to act as an ItemSource for the AutoCompleteBox control.

Below is the XAML code:

<Canvas>
     <riaControls:DomainDataSource AutoLoad="True"
                                      QueryName="GetCities"
                                      x:Name="CityDataSource">
          <riaControls:DomainDataSource.DomainContext>
                    <web:MyDatabaseContext />
          </riaControls:DomainDataSource.DomainContext>
     </riaControls:DomainDataSource>
     <sdk:Label Content="Enter the city: " Margin="46,76,264,198" />
<sdk:AutoCompleteBox Height="28" ItemsSource="{Binding Data, ElementName=CityDataSource}"
HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="142,77,0,0" FilterMode="StartsWith" MinimumPrefixLength="1" MaxDropDownHeight="80"
Name="autoCompleteBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="120" Canvas.Left="-6" Canvas.Top="-5" />
</Canvas>



European Silverlight 5 Hosting - UK :: Style Setters with Silverlight 5

clock November 17, 2014 07:12 by author Scott

One of new Silverlight 5 feature is Style Setter. This great feature was heavily missing from the earlier Silverlight version. The functionality is pretty useful and is extensively used in WPF applications.

Implementing MVVM scenarios with controls inherited from ItemsControls is not an easy way and sometimes may require a lot of work.

Say binding IsSelected on C1TreeView or binding GroupName/HeaderBackground in C1Menu. There are lot of workarounds to these scenarios.

Setting binding in Style Setters is really helpful in these scenarios and it does reduces a lot of work.

Lets see this by an example. Below are the simple classes that we will be using for binding purposes:-

public class Parent
  {
    public string Name{get;set;}
    public List<Child> Childs{get;set;}
    public bool IsSelected { get; set; }
  } 

 public class Child
  {
   public Child(string name)
    {
     this.Name=name;
    }
   public string Name{get;set;}
   public bool IsSelected { get; set; }
  }

Lets populate the collection in our ViewModel:-

public class MyViewModel
  {
   private List<Parent> _collections;
   public MyViewModel()
    {
     _collections = new List<Parent>();
     _collections.Add(new Parent() { Name = "P1", Childs = new List<Child>() { new Child("C11"){IsSelected=true} , new Child("C12"), new Child("C13") } });
     _collections.Add(new Parent() { Name = "P2", IsSelected=true, Childs = new List<Child>() { new Child("C21"), new Child("C22"), new Child("C23") } });
     _collections.Add(new Parent() { Name = "P3", Childs = new List<Child>() { new Child("C31"), new Child("C32"), new Child("C33") } });
     } 

   public List<Parent> Collections
     {
      get
        {
         return _collections;
        }
      }
    }

Next is important xaml that shows the entire binding stuff in xaml:-

<c1:C1TreeView ItemsSource="{Binding Collections}" Grid.Row="1">
 <c1:C1TreeView.ItemTemplate>
 <c1:C1HierarchicalDataTemplate ItemsSource="{Binding Childs}">
 <TextBlock HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" Margin="2" Text="{Binding Name}"/>
 </c1:C1HierarchicalDataTemplate>
 </c1:C1TreeView.ItemTemplate>
<c1:C1TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>
 <Style TargetType="c1:C1TreeViewItem">
 <Setter    Property="IsSelected" Value="{Binding IsSelected}"/>
 </Style>
 </c1:C1TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>
</c1:C1TreeView>

As you can see from the above xaml code, we have used the ItemContainerStyle and bound theIsSelected property on the C1TreeViewItem with the IsSelected property exposed on our class. That was pretty simple. Isnt It?

With earlier versions, you may have to use some helper classes like SetterValueBindingHelper to achieve the same thing.

You can set similar type of styles to most of the controls inherited from ItemsControl like C1Menu,C1Accordion, C1Book etc.  while still obeying the rules of standard MVVM.

The things doesn’t stop here. With this new feature, its pretty easy to bind the C1DataGrid’s row /cell background/foreground/fontweight etc. all in xaml without manually setting the properties in code. See below xaml code which binds the IsAvailable property on the bound item toDataGridRowPresenters Background/Fontweight:-

<Style x:Key="myrowstyle" TargetType="c1:DataGridRowPresenter">
 <Setter  Property="Background" Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}, Path=Row.DataItem.IsAvailable, Converter={StaticResource BackgroundConverter}}"/>
 <Setter  Property="FontSize"  Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}, Path=Row.DataItem.IsAvailable, Converter={StaticResource FontweightConverter}}"/>
 </Style>

 



European Silverlight 5 Hosting - UK :: What is Linked and Multicolumn Text Silverlight 5?

clock October 27, 2014 08:10 by author Scott

Today, in this article let's concentrate on another SilverLight application, whereby communicating with a WCF Service to perform some operation.

What is Linked and Multicolumn Text?

In simple terms "It enables content to render on browser as per column wise when the text is over flown. So for this we can linkup textbox with other, to make sure it flows into next textbox control when the current textbox is full with the content".

 

Let's get this implemented practically for a better idea of this.

1. The complete code of the IService1.cs looks like this.

Code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.ServiceModel.Web;
using System.Text;
Namespace WCF_Linked_Text
{
    // NOTE: You can use the "Rename" command on the "Refactor" menu to change the     interface name "IService1" in both code and config file together.
    [ServiceContract]
    Public Interface IService1
    {
      [OperationContract]
       string text1();
      [OperationContract]
       string text2();
    }
}

2. The complete code of the Service1.svc.cs looks like this.

Code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.ServiceModel.Web;
using System.Text;
namespace WCF_Linked_Text
{
    // NOTE: You can use the "Rename" command on the "Refactor" menu to change the classname "Service1" in code, svc and config file together.
    public class Service1 : IService1
    {
        public string text1()
        {
            return "RichTextBox 1 Message via WCF ";
        }
        public string text2()
        {
            return "RichTextBox 2 Message via WCF ";
        }
    }
}

3. The complete code of the Web.Config looks like this.

Code

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>
  <system.web>
    <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0" />
  </system.web>
  <system.serviceModel>
    <behaviors>
      <serviceBehaviors>
        <behavior>
          <!-- To avoid disclosing metadata information, set the value below to false and remove the metadata endpoint above before deployment -->
          <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true"/>
          <!-- To receive exception details in faults for debugging purposes, set the value below to true. Set to false before deployment to avoid disclosing  exception information -->
          <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="false"/>
        </behavior>
      </serviceBehaviors>
    </behaviors>
    <serviceHostingEnvironment multipleSiteBindingsEnabled="true" />
  </system.serviceModel>
  <system.webServer>
    <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"/>
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>

4. The complete code of the Clientaccesspolicy.xml looks like this (to avoid cross domain problem in SilverLight).

Code

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<access-policy>
    <cross-domain-access>
        <policy>
            <allow-from http-request-headers="SOAPAction">
                <domain uri="*"/>
            </allow-from>
            <grant-to>
                <resource path="/" include-subpaths="true"/>
            </grant-to>
        </policy>
    </cross-domain-access>
</access-policy>

5. The complete code of the MainPage.xaml looks like this.

Code

<UserControl x:Class="Linked_Text_and_Multi_Column_Application.MainPage"\
    xmlns=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation
    xmlns:x=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml
    xmlns:d=http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    d:DesignHeight="224" d:DesignWidth="400">
     <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Height="253">
         <RichTextBlock x:Name="richTextBlock1"
                       HorizontalAlignment="Left"
                       Margin="0,12,0,134"
                       Width="168"
                       MouseEnter="richTextBlock1_MouseEnter"
                       OverflowContentTarget="{Binding ElementName=richTextBlock2}"
                       FontFamily="Verdana"
                       FontSize="22">
        <Paragraph>jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjsssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj
                        jjjjjjjjjjjj
</Paragraph>
        </RichTextBlock>
          <RichTextBlockOverflow HorizontalAlignment="Left"
                               Margin="220,13,0,133"
                               Name="richTextBlock2"
                               Width="168" 
                               MouseEnter="richTextBlock2_MouseEnter">
          </RichTextBlockOverflow>
      </Grid>
</UserControl>

6. The complete code of the MainPage.xaml.cs looks like this.

Code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Documents;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Media.Animation;
using System.Windows.Shapes;
using Linked_Text_and_Multi_Column_Application.ServiceReference1;
namespace Linked_Text_and_Multi_Column_Application
{
    public partial class MainPage : UserControl
    {
        public MainPage()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
                  }
         private void text1_Call(object sender, text1CompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(e.Result, "Linked Text - MultiColumn", MessageBoxButton.OKCancel);
        }
         private void richTextBlock1_MouseEnter(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            objClient.text1Completed +=new EventHandler<text1CompletedEventArgs>(text1_Call);
            objClient.text1Async();
        }
         private void text2_Call(object sender, text2CompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(e.Result, "Linked Text - MultiColumn", MessageBoxButton.OKCancel);
        }
         private void richTextBlock2_MouseEnter(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            objClient.text2Completed += new EventHandler<text2CompletedEventArgs>(text2_Call);
            objClient.text2Async();
        }
         #region Instance Variables
        Service1Client objClient = new Service1Client();
        #endregion
     }
}

7. The output of the application looks like this.

8. The output of the RichTextBox1 Hover Application looks like this

9. The output of RichTextBox2 Hover Application looks like this.



European HostForLIFE.eu Proudly Launches ASP.NET 4.5.1 Hosting

clock January 30, 2014 06:11 by author Scott

HostForLIFE.eu proudly launches the support of ASP.NET 4.5.1 on all their newest Windows Server environment. HostForLIFE.eu ASP.NET 4.5.1 Hosting plan starts from just as low as €3.00/month only.

ASP.NET is Microsoft's dynamic website technology, enabling developers to create data-driven websites using the .NET platform and the latest version is 4.5.1 with lots of awesome features.

According to Microsoft officials, much of the functionality in the ASP.NET 4.5.1 release is focused on improving debugging and general diagnostics. The update also builds on top of .NET 4.5 and includes new features such as async-aware debugging, ADO.NET idle connection resiliency, ASP.NET app suspension, and allows developers to enable Edit and Continue for 64-bit.

HostForLIFE.eu is a popular online ASP.NET based hosting service provider catering to those people who face such issues. The company has managed to build a strong client base in a very short period of time. It is known for offering ultra-fast, fully-managed and secured services in the competitive market.

The new ASP.NET 4.5.1 also add support for asynchronous debugging for C#, VB, JavaScript and C++ developers. ASP.NET 4.5.1 also adds performance improvements for apps running on multicore machines. And more C++ standards support, including features like delegating constructors, raw string literals, explicit conversion operators and variadic templates.

Microsoft also is continuing to add features meant to entice more JavaScript and HTML development for those using Visual Studio to build Windows Store. Further information and the full range of features ASP.NET 4.5.1 Hosting can be viewed here http://www.hostforlife.eu/European-ASPNET-451-Hosting.



Press Release - Wordpress 3.8 Hosting with HostForLIFE.eu from Only €3.00/month

clock January 23, 2014 10:41 by author Scott

HostForLIFE.eu proudly launches the support of WordPress 3.8 on all their newest Windows Server environment. HostForLIFE.eu WordPress 3.8 Hosting plan starts from just as low as €3.00/month only.

WordPress is a flexible platform which helps to create your new websites with the CMS (content management system). There are lots of benefits in using the WordPress blogging platform like quick installation, self updating, open source platform, lots of plug-ins on the database and more options for website themes and the latest version is 3.8 with lots of awesome features.

WordPress 3.8 was released in December 2013, which introduces a brand new, completely updated admin design: with a fresh, uncluttered aesthetic that embraces clarity and simplicity; new typography (Open Sans) that’s optimized for both desktop and mobile viewing; and superior contrast that makes the whole dashboard better looking and easier to navigate.

HostForLIFE.eu is a popular online WordPress hosting service provider catering to those people who face such issues. The company has managed to build a strong client base in a very short period of time. It is known for offering ultra-fast, fully-managed and secured services in the competitive market.

Another wonderful feature of WordPress 3.8 is that it uses vector-based icons in the admin dashboard. This eliminates the need for pixel-based icons. With vector-based icons, the admin dashboard loads faster and the icons look sharper. No matter what device you use – whether it’s a smartphone, tablet, or a laptop computer, the icons actually scale to fit your screen.

WordPress 3.8 is a great platform to build your web presence with. HostForLIFE.eu can help customize any web software that company wishes to utilize. Further information and the full range of features WordPress 3.8 Hosting can be viewed here http://www.hostforlife.eu.

 



Press Release - European HostForLIFE.eu Proudly Launches Umbraco 7 Hosting

clock January 15, 2014 11:33 by author Scott

HostForLIFE.eu, a leading Windows web hosting provider with innovative technology solutions and a dedicated professional services team, today announced the supports for Umbraco 7 Hosting plan due to high demand of Umbraco 7 CMS users in Europe. Umbraco 7 features the stable engine of Umbraco 6 powering hundreds of thousands of websites, but now enriched with a completely new, remarkably fast and simple user interface.

Umbraco is fast becoming the leading .NET based, license-free (open-source) content management system. It is an enterprise level CMS with a fantastic user-interface and an incredibly flexible framework which is both scalable and easy to use. Umbraco is used on more than 85,000 websites, including sites for large companies such as Microsoft and Toyota.

HostForLIFE.eu is a popular online Umbraco 7 hosting service provider catering to those people who face such issues. The company has managed to build a strong client base in a very short period of time. It is known for offering ultra-fast, fully-managed and secured services in the competitive market.

Umbraco has given a lot of thought to the user experience of their CMS. The interface uses a navigational flow and editing tools that anybody using Windows Explorer and Microsoft Word will immediately recognise. Your site structure sits in a tree view - just like Windows Explorer. Anybody with experience using Microsoft Word, can use Umbraco's simple rich text editing (RTE) interface.

"Umbraco 7 is easy to install within few clicks, special thanks to HostForLIFE.eu special designed user friendly web hosting control panel systems." - Ivan Carlos, one of the many HostForLIFE.eu satisfying clients.

Further information and the full range of features Umbraco 7 Hosting can be viewed here http://hostforlife.eu/European-Umbraco-7-Hosting.



European Silverlight 5 Hosting - Nederland :: Silverlight 5 Viewbox Control

clock January 8, 2014 07:11 by author Scott

This article will explore how to use the ViewBox control in Silverlight 5.

The ViewBox control allows you to place a child control such as Image within it in such a way that it will be scaled appropriately to fit the available without any distortion. It is typically used in 2D graphics.

We will begin with creating a new Silverlight 5 project.

Modify the existing XAML code of MainPage.xaml so that a Grid of 1 column and three rows is created. The code for the same is shown below:

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightDemo.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006 mc:Ignorable="d" xmlns:sdk=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/ sdk HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch">
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Height="300" Width="300">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

Drag and drop the Viewbox control from the Toolbox into the XAML code between the <Grid></Grid> tags. Specify its row and column in the grid to be 0. The resulting code is seen below.

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightDemo.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006 mc:Ignorable="d" xmlns:sdk=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/ sdk HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch">        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
  </controls:Viewbox
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

Drag and drop the Viewbox control from the Toolbox into the XAML code between the <Grid></Grid> tags. Specify its row and column in the grid to be 0. The resulting code is seen below.

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightDemo.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006 mc:Ignorable="d" xmlns:sdk=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/ sdk HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch">        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
  </controls:Viewbox
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

Right click on the project name in the Solution Explorer pane and select Add Existing Item option. Choose the image "Winter.jg" from the My Documents\My Pictures\Sample Pictures folder.

Drag and drop an Image control in between the <controls:ViewBox> and </controls:ViewBox> tag and modify its code as shown below, to specify its source and size.

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Height="300" Width="300">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
            <Image Source="Winter.jpg" Height="40" Width="40"></Image>
        </controls:Viewbox>
    </Grid>

Drag and drop another ViewBox and then an Image control in between the second <controls:ViewBox> and </controls:ViewBox> tag.

Modify the XAML as shown below:

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Height="300" Width="300">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
            <Image Source="Winter.jpg" Height="40" Width="40"></Image>
        </controls:Viewbox>
<controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="0" Height="70" Width="90">
    <Image Source="Winter.jpg" Height="40" Width="40"></Image></controls:Viewbox
    </Grid>

Save the solution, build and execute it. When you see the output, you will observe that the two images show no distortion whatsoever though their height and width are not the same. This has happened because of the ViewBox.



Press Release - European HostForLIFE.eu Proudly Launches DotNetNuke 7.1 Hosting

clock January 7, 2014 07:20 by author Scott

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European Silverlight 5 Hosting - Amsterdam :: Vector and Bitmap Printing for Reports in Silverlight 5

clock October 17, 2013 07:11 by author Scott

Printing Basics

Just as it was in Silverlight 4, Printing is centered around the PrintDocument class, found in System.Windows.Printing. This class has three primary events: BeginPrint, EndPrint, and PrintPage, which are your hooks into the printing system. You do setup in BeginPrint, teardown in EndPrint, and all the actual page production in PrintPage.

Page Markup

Here's the simple test page XAML I used for this printing example.

<Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
    <Button Content="Print Bitmap"
            Height="23"
            HorizontalAlignment="Left"
            Margin="141,79,0,0"
            Name="PrintBitmap"
            VerticalAlignment="Top"
            Width="95"
            Click="PrintBitmap_Click" />
    <Button Content="Print Vector"
            Height="23"
            HorizontalAlignment="Left"
            Margin="141,108,0,0"
            Name="PrintVector"
            VerticalAlignment="Top"
            Width="95"
            Click="PrintVector_Click" />
    <Button Content="Force Vector"
            Height="23"
            HorizontalAlignment="Left"
            Margin="141,137,0,0"
            Name="PrintVectorForced
            VerticalAlignment="Top"
            Width="95"
            Click="PrintVectorForced_Click" />
</Grid>

The application UI looks really simple, just three buttons on a page. This is one of my finest designs.

Next, I'll wire up an event handler for each button, and use it to demonstrate the behavior of the three different printing approaches.

Page Code for Basic Vector Printing

Here's the code for a basic vector print of 30 rows.

// Tests basic (not forced) vector printing  
private void PrintVector_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    PrintDocument doc = new PrintDocument();

    doc.PrintPage += (s, ea) =>
        {
            StackPanel printPanel = new StackPanel();

            Random rnd = new Random();

            for (int i = 0; i < 30; i++)
            {                  
                TextBlock row = new TextBlock();
                row.Text = "This is row " + i + " of the current page being printed in vector mode.";                      

                printPanel.Children.Add(row);
            }

            ea.PageVisual = printPanel;
            ea.HasMorePages = false;
        };

    PrinterFallbackSettings settings = new PrinterFallbackSettings();

    doc.Print("Silverlight Vector Print");
}

Note that the PageVisual is assigned after the printPanel is populated. If you assign it prior, and do not force a recalculation of layout (in my example, the panel isn't in the visual tree, but layout is calculated with you assign PageVisual), you'll get a StackPanel with 30 items all piled on each other in the same row. The easiest way to fix this is to assign the PageVisual after the visual has all its children populated.

You could also point the PageVisual to an on-screen visual if you desire. If you're going to do that, you'll need to unhook the visual from the tree first, as a single element cannot have two parents.

If you have no more pages to print other than this one, set HasMorePages to false. If you have additional pages after this one, set it to true.

Printer Fallback Settings and Forcing Vector Printing Mode

New in Silverlight 5 is the PrinterFallbackSettings class. This class is used by one of the overloads of PrintDocument.Print to set two options: ForceVector and OpacityThreshold.

In the previous example, if you had any elements that had opacity other than 1.0, perspective transforms, or other things PostScript doesn't understand, Silverlight would silently fall back to bitmap-based printing.

ForceVector forces Silverlight to print in vector mode, assuming you have a PostScript-enabled printer driver, even when postscript-incompatible items exist in the element tree assigned to PageVisual. You use this in tandem with OpacityThreshold. The Opacity threshold sets the value over which Silverlight will treat an element's opacity as 1.0 to support PostScript printing.

// tests trying to force vector printing mode
private void PrintVectorForced_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    PrintDocument doc = new PrintDocument();

    doc.PrintPage += (s, ea) =>
    {
        StackPanel printPanel = new StackPanel();

        Random rnd = new Random();

        for (int i = 0; i < 30; i++)
        {
            TextBlock row = new TextBlock();
            row.Opacity = (rnd.Next(3, 10)) / 10.0;
            row.Text = "This is row " + i + " of the current page being printed. Opacity is " + row.Opacity;

            printPanel.Children.Add(row);
        }

        ea.PageVisual = printPanel;
        ea.HasMorePages = false;
    };

    PrinterFallbackSettings settings = new PrinterFallbackSettings();
    settings.ForceVector = true;
    settings.OpacityThreshold = 0.5;

    doc.Print("Silverlight Forced Vector Print", settings);
}

If your content or your printer doesn't support PostScript printing, Silverlight automatically falls back to sending an uncompressed bitmap to the printer. If your printer doesn't support PostScript, you'll see the effect of opacity in the printed results (some items lighter colored than others, for example) as the fallback bitmap mode supports opacity.

Printing in Bitmap Mode

Sometimes you know you want to print in bitmap mode. Rather than let vector mode fall back to bitmap, you can simply force bitmap printing from the start. If you have a PostScript compatible printer and driver, this is quite a bit faster than it was in Silverlight 4, as the bitmap is compressed. If you don't have a PostScript driver, it sends a plain old uncompressed bitmap just like Silverlight 4.

// tests printing in bitmap mode
private void PrintBitmap_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    PrintDocument doc = new PrintDocument();

    doc.PrintPage += (s, ea) =>
    {
        StackPanel printPanel = new StackPanel();

        Random rnd = new Random();

        for (int i = 0; i < 30; i++)
        {
            TextBlock row = new TextBlock();
            row.Opacity = (rnd.Next(3, 10)) / 10.0;
            row.Text = "This is row " + i + " of the current page being printed in bitmap mode. Opacity is " + row.Opacity;

            printPanel.Children.Add(row);
        }

        ea.PageVisual = printPanel;
        ea.HasMorePages = false;
    };

    doc.PrintBitmap("Silverlight Bitmap Print");
}

Bitmap mode will preserve the opacity settings, as well as ensure render transforms are printed (assuming you apply them) etc. It's not the best approach for printing a report, but it's the highest-fidelity approach for printing visuals when you want to do the equivalent of a print-screen.

The resolution of the bitmap sent is set to the selected printer resolution, typically 600dpi.

Efficient Printing

So, for the most efficient printing of multi-page reports, you'll want to make sure you do the following:

  • Have a PostScript-compatible printer with an appropriate PostScript driver (typically ends with " PS")
  • Avoid Opacity other than 1.0 in your elements to be printed (or use the appropriate fallback settings)
  • Leave out perspective transforms, 3d, and other things not compatible with PostScript printing.


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