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Silverlight 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Create an Analog Clock application in Silverlight

clock March 22, 2019 11:17 by author Peter

Today, I will explain you how to create an analog clock apps in Silverlight 6. Of course open new projectin visual studio and select a Silverlight project. In Mainpage.xaml  draw an ellipse which will serve as background for our Analog clock. The code looks as following:

 

<Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
        <Ellipse Margin="165,67,145,83" Fill="Goldenrod" Width="330"
         Height="330" Opacity="0.7"/>
    </Grid>

Then, draw another ellipse in the same grid which will serve as Outer Rim for our analog clock. The Complete code looks on the below:
<Ellipse Height="330" Margin="156,58,154,92" Width="330" 
Stroke="Goldenrod">
            <Ellipse.Fill>
<LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.84,0.87" Opacity="0.9"  
StartPoint="0.164,0.129">
                    <GradientStop Color="Goldenrod"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Gold" Offset="0.7"/>
                </LinearGradientBrush>
            </Ellipse.Fill>
        </Ellipse>              


Next, I want to draw another ellipse in the same grid which will serve as Bevel for our analog clock. And this is the code that I used:
        <Ellipse Height="290" Margin="156,58,154,92" Width="290" Stroke="Goldenrod">
            <Ellipse.Fill>
                    <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.84,0.87" Opacity="0.5" StartPoint="0.164,0.129">
                    <GradientStop Color="Goldenrod"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Goldenrod" Offset="0.987"/>
                </LinearGradientBrush>
            </Ellipse.Fill>
        </Ellipse>     

Now draw another ellipse in the same grid which will serve as a Face for our analog clock. This is the code snippet:
<Ellipse Height="270" Margin="176,78,174,112" Width="270"
         Stroke="Goldenrod" Fill="Yellow" Opacity="0.3"/>

Now we are going to draw the hour,minute and seconds hand. Then draw a rectangle in the same grid which will serve as a Hour hand for our analog clock with the code below:
<Rectangle x:Name="hourHand" Height="59" Margin="315.75,180,314.25,0"
        VerticalAlignment="Top" Fill="Black" Stroke="Black" Width="10" RenderTransformOrigin="0.525,1.428">
            <Rectangle.RenderTransform>
                <RotateTransform x:Name="hourHandAnimation"/>
            </Rectangle.RenderTransform>
        </Rectangle>


Now draw another rectangle in the same grid which will serve as a Minute hand for our analog clock. And this is the code that I used:
<Rectangle x:Name="minuteHand" Height="80" Margin="316.75,160,315.25,0"       
VerticalAlignment="Top" Fill="Black" Stroke="Black" Width="8"
        RenderTransformOrigin="0.5,1.312" >
            <Rectangle.RenderTransform>
                <RotateTransform x:Name="minuteHandAnimation"/>
            </Rectangle.RenderTransform>
        </Rectangle>

Now we are going to draw another rectangle in the same grid which will serve as a Seconds hand for our analog clock. And this is the code that I used:
<Rectangle Height="80" Margin="318.25,160,316.75,0"
        VerticalAlignment="Top" Fill="#FFFF0000" Stroke="#FF000000"
        Width="5" RenderTransformOrigin="0.10,1.312" >
            <Rectangle.RenderTransform>
                <RotateTransform x:Name="secondHandAnimation"/>
            </Rectangle.RenderTransform>
        </Rectangle>

Now, our design part is complete. Now we have to give animations to our hour, minute and second’s hands. For this, let us take a storyboard. We should write the code for storyboard outside the Grid.  The complete code for all the three animations is as follows.
<UserControl.Resources>
        <Storyboard x:Name="silverlightClock">
            <DoubleAnimation x:Name="hourAnimation"                            
                             Storyboard.TargetName="hourHandAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetProperty="Angle"
                             Duration="12:0:0" RepeatBehavior="Forever" To="360"/>          
            <DoubleAnimation x:Name="minuteAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetName="minuteHandAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetProperty="Angle"
                             Duration="1:0:0" RepeatBehavior="Forever"/>                                                                
            <DoubleAnimation x:Name="secondAnimation"                            
                             Storyboard.TargetName="secondHandAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetProperty="Angle"
                             Duration="0:1:0" RepeatBehavior="Forever"/>                                   
 </Storyboard>
 </UserControl.Resources>

Now we have to write the code for these 3 animations (hourAnimation, minuteAnimation  and secondAnimation ) in MainPage.xaml.cs. The code looks as follows.
private void startClock(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            System.DateTime currentTime = DateTime.Now;
double hourAngle = ((float)currentTime.Hour) / 12 * 360 +                 
currentTime.Minute/2;          
hourAnimation.From = hourAngle;
            hourAnimation.To = hourAngle + 360;         
           double minuteAngle = ((float)currentTime.Minute) / 60 * 360;
            minuteAnimation.From = minuteAngle;
            minuteAnimation.To=minuteAngle+360;
           double secondAngle = ((float)currentTime.Second) / 60 * 360;
            secondAnimation.From = secondAngle;
            secondAnimation.To = secondAngle + 360;
            silverlightClock.Begin();
        }                          

We need to call the method “startClock” in our grid control and assign it to “Loaded” property of the grid control. The code for this looks as follows.
  <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Loaded="startClock"> 
</Grid>


Finally! Our Analog clock is ready. Now you should refresh and see it.

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European Silverlight 6 Hosting - Nederland :: Silverlight 5 Viewbox Control

clock March 15, 2019 09:45 by author Peter

This article will explore how to use the ViewBox control in Silverlight 6. The ViewBox control allows you to place a child control such as Image within it in such a way that it will be scaled appropriately to fit the available without any distortion. It is typically used in 2D graphics.

We will begin with creating a new Silverlight 6 project. Modify the existing XAML code of MainPage.xaml so that a Grid of 1 column and three rows is created. The code for the same is shown below:

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightDemo.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006 mc:Ignorable="d" xmlns:sdk=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/ sdk HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch">
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Height="300" Width="300">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

Drag and drop the Viewbox control from the Toolbox into the XAML code between the <Grid></Grid> tags. Specify its row and column in the grid to be 0. The resulting code is seen below.

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightDemo.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006 mc:Ignorable="d" xmlns:sdk=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/ sdk HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch">        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
  </controls:Viewbox
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

Drag and drop the Viewbox control from the Toolbox into the XAML code between the <Grid></Grid> tags. Specify its row and column in the grid to be 0. The resulting code is seen below.

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightDemo.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006 mc:Ignorable="d" xmlns:sdk=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/ sdk HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch">        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
  </controls:Viewbox
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

Right click on the project name in the Solution Explorer pane and select Add Existing Item option. Choose the image "Winter.jg" from the My Documents\My Pictures\Sample Pictures folder.

Drag and drop an Image control in between the <controls:ViewBox> and </controls:ViewBox> tag and modify its code as shown below, to specify its source and size.

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Height="300" Width="300">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
            <Image Source="Winter.jpg" Height="40" Width="40"></Image>
        </controls:Viewbox>
    </Grid>

Drag and drop another ViewBox and then an Image control in between the second <controls:ViewBox> and </controls:ViewBox> tag.

Modify the XAML as shown below:

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Height="300" Width="300">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="200" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
         <controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0" Height="120" Width="120">
            <Image Source="Winter.jpg" Height="40" Width="40"></Image>
        </controls:Viewbox>
<controls:Viewbox Grid.Row="1" Grid.Column="0" Height="70" Width="90">
    <Image Source="Winter.jpg" Height="40" Width="40"></Image></controls:Viewbox
    </Grid>

Save the solution, build and execute it. When you see the output, you will observe that the two images show no distortion whatsoever though their height and width are not the same. This has happened because of the ViewBox.

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Silverlight 6 Hosting Netherland - HostForLIFE.eu :: Image Brush in Silverlight

clock March 1, 2019 11:07 by author Peter

This article demonstrates how to create and use an image brush in Silverlight using XAML and C#.

z

Image Brush
An image brush paints an area with an image. The ImageSource property represents the image to be used during the painting by an image brush. The ImageBrush object represents an image brush.

Creating an Image Brush
The ImageBrush element in XAML creates an image brush. The ImageSource property of the ImageBrush represents the image used in the painting process.

The following code snippet creates an image brush and sets the ImageSource property to an image.
<ImageBrush ImageSource="dock.jpg" />


We can fill a shape with an image brush by setting a shape's Fill property to the image brush. The code snippet in Listing 1 creates a rectangle shape sets the Fill property to an ImageBrush.
<Rectangle
    Width="200"
    Height="100"
    Stroke="Black"
    StrokeThickness="4">
    <Rectangle.Fill>
        <ImageBrush ImageSource="dock.jpg" />
    </Rectangle.Fill>
</Rectangle>

Listing 1
The CreateAnImageBrush method listed in Listing 2 draws same rectangle with an image brush in Figure 1 dynamically.
/// <summary>
/// Fills a rectangle with an ImageBrush
/// </summary>
public void CreateAnImageBrush()
{
    // Create a Rectangle

    Rectangle blueRectangle = new Rectangle();
    blueRectangle.Height = 100;
    blueRectangle.Width = 200;

     // Create an ImageBrush
    ImageBrush imgBrush = new ImageBrush();
     imgBrush.ImageSource =
        new BitmapImage(new Uri(@"Dock.jpg", UriKind.Relative));
     // Fill rectangle with an ImageBrush

    blueRectangle.Fill = imgBrush;

    // Add Rectangle to the Grid.
    LayoutRoot.Children.Add(blueRectangle);
}

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Silverlight 6 Hosting Netherland - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Display a Pop Up Layer in Web Page using Silverlight

clock January 25, 2019 11:55 by author Peter

In this tutorial, you will learn how to show a non-annoying popup layer within a Silverlight web page.

Let's follow these steps:

Step 1

Add a button to your xaml page as shown below:

<Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" >
<Button Width="100" Height="50" x:Name="showPopup"
Click="showPopup_Click" Content="Show Popup" />
</Grid>

Step 2

Then, add the following code to your code behind file (page.xaml.cs):

Popup p = new Popup();
private void showPopup_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{

1. Create a panel control to host other controls
    StackPanel panel1 = new StackPanel();
    panel1.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Gray);

2. Create a button
    Button button1 = new Button();
    button1.Content = "Close";
    button1.Margin = new Thickness(5.0);
    button1.Click += new RoutedEventHandler(button1_Click);

3. Create a text label
    TextBlock textblock1 = new TextBlock();
    Textblock1.Text = "The popup control";
    Textblock1.Margin = new Thickness(5.0);

4. Add text label and button to the panel
    panel1.Children.Add(textblock1);
    panel1.Children.Add(button1);

Step 3

Now, make the panel a child of the popup so that the panel will be shown within the Popup when displayed:

   p.Child = panel1;

And you can set a position:

 p.VerticalOffset = 25;
   p.HorizontalOffset = 25;

Use this code to show the popup:

p.IsOpen = true;
}

void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{

Then, to close the popup, follow this code:

// Close the popup.
   p.IsOpen = false;
}

Step 4

Now run the application. You can see the page with a button. When you click on the button, a popup layer will appear with a text label and a button in it. When you click on the button in the popup, it will close the popup.

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Silverlight 6 Hosting UK - HostForLIFE.eu :: INotifyPropertyChanged in Silverlight

clock January 9, 2019 11:35 by author Peter

Data binding is one of the coolest gimmicks that have ever existed in Silverlight. Binding a UI Element's property with a property in the code behind, has the ability to do any sort of trap. It's wizardry, basically. Once the properties are bound, we have to continue telling the UI if the property's estimation has been adjusted in the code. INotifyPropertyChanged is helpful for this.

You see, since it is an interface, we have to first actualize it. The procedure is not exceptionally extreme however. In the new Silverlight project, here is the code of my main page:
publicpartialclassMainPage : UserControl
{
    privatestring _names; 
    publicstring Names
    {
        get
        {
           return _names;
        }
        set
        {
            _names = value;
        }
   } 
    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    } 
    privatevoid MainPage_OnLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Names = "This is the Text";
    }
}


The property "Name" I have here is bound with the textblock in XAML. Now write the following code:
<UserControlx:Class="PropertyChangedDescribed.MainPage"
 xmlns=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation
 xmlns:x=http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml
 xmlns:d=http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008
 xmlns:mc=http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006
  mc:Ignorable="d"
 Loaded="MainPage_OnLoaded"
 x:Name="TestingPropertyChanged"
 d:DesignHeight="300"d:DesignWidth="400">
 <Gridx:Name="LayoutRoot"Background="White">
  <TextBlockText="{Binding Names, ElementName=TestingPropertyChanged}"/>
  </Grid>
</UserControl>

As should be obvious, the textblock has its "text" property bound with our code behind's property "Name". At this moment, regardless of what you set the estimation of "Name", it will never be reflected onto the UI. Thus, what we need is, each time we change the estimation of our property "Name," the content piece has its esteem changed as well. To do this, we have to actualize the interface INotifyPropertyChanged. Here is the changed primary page's code to do as such:
publicpartialclassMainPage : UserControl, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    privatestring _names;
     publicstring Names
    {
        get
        {
            return _names;
        }
        set
        {
            _names = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("Names");
        }
    } 
    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    } 
    privatevoid MainPage_OnLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Names = "This is the Text";
    } 
    publicevent PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
     privatevoid OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (this.PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this,new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

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Silverlight 4 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Make Video Player?

clock April 12, 2016 23:41 by author Anthony

Today, I will make a tutorial about how to make simple video player with Silverlight 4. Once you have that lets make the project, We want to make a Silverlight Application and after naming your project, on the next dialogue select Silverlight 4 from the combo box.


The Pre-created code for our project should look like this:

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightApplication3.MainPage"

    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"

    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"

    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/exp<b></b>ression/blend/2008"

    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"

    mc:Ignorable="d"

    d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="400">
 
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">

    </Grid>

</UserControl>

However, We don't need all those links, We only need a couple they are
view sourceprint?

xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"

   xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"

So you can delete the others, Once you have your code should look like this:
view sourceprint?

<UserControl x:Class="SilverlightApplication3.MainPage"

    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"

    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
        
    </Grid>

</UserControl>

After that minor tweak, We now need to add a Canvas tag to hold all of our video player elements together for us, To do this we need to put the <Canvas> Tag between the <Grid> Tags.

    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">

    <Canvas Name="Holder" Width="350" Height="220" Background="Black">

    </Canvas>

</Grid>


These properties of the Canvas are very common in our project, All our elements will have a Name, A Height and a Width. They are measured in Pixels so you can easily make this pixel-perfect if you want to. The name is what we use to address the element of the project, We will need this later on. So We have in effect a black shape. We now need to add the video in, to do this we need to use the <MediaElement> tag. This have three main properties that we need in addition to a Name, Width and Height we need the Source, Volume and AutoPlay settings.

- The source is what we want the media element to find and play, In our case the video is at media/media.wmv so, Our source would look like this

Source="media/media.wmv"

- The volume setting is pretty self explanitoriy so we will set it to 100 for this tutorial.
- The AutoPlay setting has two values, True or False, It determines if the video should automatically play when it has loaded, for this tutorial we will set it to False.

So after all that, Our MediaElement Code should look like this

<MediaElement Name="Video" Source="media/media.wmv" AutoPlay="False" Volume="100" />

I have named the element video so that we will not get confused to it's function later on in the tutorial.
Right ok, Now we have a video lets add some controls so that we can control it.  Using the resources I have provided, We will add a new image tag into our code, this will be our Play Button.

The code for this will be like so;

<Image Name="btnPlay" Height="17" Width="49" Source="media/play.png" />

As you can see, The element has a name, height, width and source. Because we have put all our resources into a folder in the project called media we always address the image as media/play.png instead of just play.png

We can also add other properties to this, As well as position it. To do so we will change the opacity to 0.4 and move it 220 pixels down from the canvas so we can see the button clearly. So, The code will now look like this;

<Image Name="btnPlay" Height="17" Width="49" Source="media/play.png" Opacity="0.4" Canvas.Top="220" />

The Opacity property can be any value between 0 and 1.

Right, We have an image that doesn't do anything which isn't entirely useful at the moment so lets add some code to it. Open the event window while the image is selected and find the event for MouseLeftButtonDown this is silverlights version of click. It will take you to the code behind the project for that event and this bit is very simple, the only code we need to put in this bit is Video.Play(); and thats all, That will make the video play! easy!

If your confused where to put it, this is what it should look like:

private void btnPlay_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)

       {

           Video.Play();

       }

You may notice that the source of the media element has an error on it, To fix this you find the media.wmv in the media folder and change it's Build Action to Resource and it will work fine.
You can run it now and the video will play.

 

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Silverlight 4 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Upload File In Silverlight?

clock April 5, 2016 21:06 by author Anthony

Today, I will eplain about a simple way to upload file in Silverlight. Uploading files is quite an easy one in Silverlight: it’s basically just a request made to another server and the file contents are passed in this request. A possible way of implementing this is by using the WebClient class:

private void UploadFile()
{
FileStream _data; // The file stream to be read
string uploadUri;
 
byte[] fileContent = new byte[_data.Length]; // Read the contents of the stream into a byte array
int bytesRead = _data.Read(fileContent, 0, CHUNK_SIZE);
 
WebClient wc = new WebClient();
wc.OpenWriteCompleted += new OpenWriteCompletedEventHandler(wc_OpenWriteCompleted);
Uri u = new Uri(uploadUri);
wc.OpenWriteAsync(u, null, new object[] { fileContent, bytesRead }); // Upload the file to the server
}
 
void wc_OpenWriteCompleted(object sender, OpenWriteCompletedEventArgs e) // The upload completed
{
if (e.Error == null)
{
  // Upload completed without error
}

The above solution does the job of uploading the file well. However it does not indicate file upload progress at all: when uploading large files or when having slow internet connection this behaviour would be desirable.

Silverlight has no built-in way to monitor the number of bytes sent which means that the only way to indicate upload progress is sending the file to the server in multiple, smaller chunks. Of course this behaviour needs support from the server side as well.

The idea is that multiple calls are made to the server, every call submitting the next chunk of the file. On the server these chunks are appended to the file.


Silverlight Code Snippet

public const int CHUNK_SIZE = 4096;
public const string UPLOAD_URI = "http://localhost:55087/FileUpload.ashx?filename={0}&append={1}";
private Stream _data;
private string _fileName;
private long _bytesTotal;
private long _bytesUploaded;
private void UploadFileChunk()
{
    string uploadUri = ""; // Format the upload URI according to wether the it's the first chunk of the file
    if (_bytesUploaded == 0)
    {
        uploadUri = String.Format(UPLOAD_URI,_fileName,0); // Dont't append
    }
    else if (_bytesUploaded < _bytesTotal)
    {
        uploadUri = String.Format(UPLOAD_URI, _fileName, 1); // append
    }
    else
    {
        return;  // Upload finished
    }
    byte[] fileContent = new byte[CHUNK_SIZE];
    _data.Read(fileContent, 0, CHUNK_SIZE);
    WebClient wc = new WebClient();
    wc.OpenWriteCompleted += new OpenWriteCompletedEventHandler(wc_OpenWriteCompleted);
    Uri u = new Uri(uploadUri);
    wc.OpenWriteAsync(u, null, fileContent);
    _bytesUploaded += fileContent.Length;
}
void wc_OpenWriteCompleted(object sender, OpenWriteCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Error == null)
    {  
        object[] objArr = e.UserState as object[];
        byte[] fileContent = objArr[0] as byte[];
        int bytesRead = Convert.ToInt32(objArr[1]);
        Stream outputStream = e.Result;
        outputStream.Write(fileContent, 0, bytesRead);
        outputStream.Close();
        if (_bytesUploaded < _bytesTotal)
        {
            UploadFileChunk();
        }
        else
        {
            // Upload complete
        }
    }
}

Since Silverlight is a client side technology the server side can be implemented in any language. In this example I’ve created .NET and PHP support for the server side.


.NET Server Side Code Snippet

public const int CHUNK_SIZE = 4096;
public const string UPLOAD_URI = "http://localhost:55087/FileUpload.ashx?filename={0}&append={1}";
private Stream _data;
private string _fileName;
private long _bytesTotal;
private long _bytesUploaded;
private void UploadFileChunk()
{
    string uploadUri = ""; // Format the upload URI according to wether the it's the first chunk of the file
    if (_bytesUploaded == 0)
    {
        uploadUri = String.Format(UPLOAD_URI,_fileName,0); // Dont't append
    }
    else if (_bytesUploaded < _bytesTotal)
    {
        uploadUri = String.Format(UPLOAD_URI, _fileName, 1); // append
    }
    else
    {
        return;  // Upload finished
    }
    byte[] fileContent = new byte[CHUNK_SIZE];
    _data.Read(fileContent, 0, CHUNK_SIZE);
    WebClient wc = new WebClient();
    wc.OpenWriteCompleted += new OpenWriteCompletedEventHandler(wc_OpenWriteCompleted);
    Uri u = new Uri(uploadUri);
    wc.OpenWriteAsync(u, null, fileContent);
    _bytesUploaded += fileContent.Length;
}
void wc_OpenWriteCompleted(object sender, OpenWriteCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Error == null)
    {  
        object[] objArr = e.UserState as object[];
        byte[] fileContent = objArr[0] as byte[];
        int bytesRead = Convert.ToInt32(objArr[1]);
        Stream outputStream = e.Result;
        outputStream.Write(fileContent, 0, bytesRead);
        outputStream.Close();
        if (_bytesUploaded < _bytesTotal)
        {
            UploadFileChunk();
        }
        else
        {
            // Upload complete
        }
    }
}

PHP Server Side Code Snippet

<?php
//  This is the most basic of scripts with no try catches
$filename = isset($_REQUEST["filename"]) ? $_REQUEST["filename"] : "jjj";
$append = isset($_REQUEST["append"]);
try
{
    if(!$append)
        $file = fopen($filename,"w");
    else
        $file = fopen($filename,"a");
    $input = file_get_contents ("php://input");
    fwrite($file,$input);
    fclose($file);
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
    echo 'Caught exception: ',  $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}
?>

Notes : Before running the project, set the UPLOAD_URI variable to point to the appropriate .asmx or .php file. The script is not suited for production environment because of the following:
Files are uploaded directly to the root directory of the web application. The files are created and constantly appended to. A more desirable approach would be to store the unfinished files in a temp folder until upload is complete and then move them to the upload folder

 

HostForLIFE.eu Silverlight 4 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu revolutionized hosting with Plesk Control Panel, a Web-based interface that provides customers with 24x7 access to their server and site configuration tools. Plesk completes requests in seconds. It is included free with each hosting account. Renowned for its comprehensive functionality - beyond other hosting control panels - and ease of use, Plesk Control Panel is available only to HostForLIFE's customers. They offer a highly redundant, carrier-class architecture, designed around the needs of shared hosting customers.



Silverlight 5 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Resolve and Avoid Crashes in Silverlight 5?

clock March 30, 2016 20:26 by author Anthony

Some websites require a plugin to display its content properly. When a web page containing a particular contains, eat plugin will automatically run and execute the code and render the content that is specifically aimed at the area of the web. One plugin that can do this is Silverlight. Silverlight is a product of Microsoft. Microsoft Silverlight is a cross-browser plug-in powered by the .NET that allows you to view certain multimedia such as high quality video or interactive web. But when you have problem with the content of the video or interactive web browsing, you may need updating or need to install Microsoft Silverlight on your device. Sometimes a web browser crashes can be caused by Silverlight that is not functioning properly.

If that happens, then it must be overcome so that web browsers can work as usual. So in this article, I will discuss about how to cope with a crash on the Silverlight plugin, and also how to prevent Silverlight from crashing.

STEP 1

Make sure the Silverlight plugin has been installed properly. Please try to run your web browser, and download Silverlight. Once downloaded, run the installation file. If completed please close your web browser and then run it back to see to it whether the issue has been resolved.

STEP 2

Try to reset Internet Explorer Internet Privacy Settings. Click Tools> Internet Options> Privacy, and select Sites. Then simply enter the URL of the web that you want to visit that requires the Silverlight application. Then click OK. Then please restart Internet Explorer to test Silverlight.

STEP 3

Disable the Silverlight plugin from Google Chrome your web browser, then restart your browser. Type about: plugins in the address bar. Then click the Disable button that is located next to Microsoft Silverlight. Then close the plugin tab, repeat this process and then click Enable to restart Silverlight.

STEP 4

Change the name of the file MSPR.HDS associated with Silverlight. Run Windows Explorer on your computer, open the file C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\PlayReady. Then click on MSPR.HDS file, right click and select "Rename", please rename the file with the name you want.

STEP 5

Close your web browser, and then try to run it again to test Silverlight.

 

How To Prevent Silverlight from crashes?

Google Chrome users may not be able to enjoy this plugin automatically. To overcome this problem can perform the following steps so that you can enjoy Silverlight in Google Chrome

  • Open your Google Chrome browser, type chrome://banners/#enable-NPAPI in the address bar and press enter.
  • Click Enable.
  • If you are using Silverlight in websites such as Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, you only need to right click on the content in question and select Run this plugin.
  • Now you can experience the difference when using Microsoft Silverlight plugin.

 

HostForLIFE.eu Silverlight 5 Hosting

HostForLIFE.eu revolutionized hosting with Plesk Control Panel, a Web-based interface that provides customers with 24x7 access to their server and site configuration tools. Plesk completes requests in seconds. It is included free with each hosting account. Renowned for its comprehensive functionality - beyond other hosting control panels - and ease of use, Plesk Control Panel is available only to HostForLIFE's customers. They offer a highly redundant, carrier-class architecture, designed around the needs of shared hosting customers.



Silverlight 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Create Pop Up Notifications

clock October 15, 2015 17:11 by author Rebecca

In this post, I will tell you how to create pop up notification in Silverlight. I will separate the kinds of notification into: Alert, Prompt and Confirm popup box.

There is a class called System.Windows.Browsers that comes with Silverlight. Also, there are lots of methods to create alert, prompt and confirm box using JavaScript. Let’s look further into each notification one by one:

1. Alert

HtmlPage.Window.Alert("Alert from Silverlight screen");

Same thing can be achieved using the Silverlight MessageBox. The only difference is that in case of MessageBox, you don't have the alert symbol. But at the same time with MessageBox you have the option to display appropriate title for the pop up.

MessageBox.Show("MessageBox for Silverlight", "AlertMessageBox", MessageBoxButton.OK)

2. Confirm

HtmlPage.Window.Confirm("Do you know how to call Alert from Silverlight");

The confirm method returns bool value, this can be used to perfrom further action depending upon if user clicks OK or Cancel button. Below code display how to handle the same.

bool isConfirmed = HtmlPage.Window.Confirm("Do you know how to call Alert from Silverlight");

if (isConfirmed)

 {

   //Perform some action;

 }
This thing can also be achieved using the Silverlight MessageBox. The only difference is that in case of MessageBox return type is not bool but Enum of type MessageBoxResult. Also the 3rd parameter which is of enum type MessageBoxButton should be MessageBoxButton.OkCancel

MessageBox.Show("MessageBox for Silverlight", "AlertMessageBox", MessageBoxButton.OKCancel);

MessageBoxResult isConfirmed = MessageBox.Show("MessageBox for Silverlight", "Alert MessageBox", MessageBoxButton.OKCancel);

if (isConfirmed == MessageBoxResult.OK)

 {

   //Perfrom some Action;

 }

3. Prompt

HtmlPage.Window.Prompt("whatis name of site?");

Prompt method returns string method. The input provided can be used to perform further action

string inputValue = HtmlPage.Window.Prompt("what is name of site?");

if (inputValue.Trim() == "Experts Comment")

 {

   //Perfrom some action;

 }


HostForLIFE.eu Silverlight 6 Hosting

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Silverlight 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Create a Similar List like Mac using Silverlight

clock October 8, 2015 13:09 by author Rebecca

In this tutorial, we will create the standard Silverlight ListBox will be customized to be functionally similar to a ListBox you would find on a Mac.

The XAML for this tutorial contains a custom style that we use to disable the scrollbar:

<UserControl x:Class="CustomListBox.Page"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Width="400" Height="300">
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
        <Grid.Resources>
            <Style x:Key="ListBoxStyle1" TargetType="ListBox">
                <Setter Property="Template">
                    <Setter.Value>
                        <ControlTemplate TargetType="ListBox">
                            <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot">
                                <Border Padding="5" BorderBrush="#000000" BorderThickness="1" Background="#ffffff" CornerRadius="0">
                                    <ScrollViewer x:Name="ScrollViewer" VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Hidden" Padding="{TemplateBinding Padding}" Background="{TemplateBinding Background}" BorderBrush="Transparent" BorderThickness="0">
                                        <ItemsPresenter />
                                    </ScrollViewer>
                                </Border>
                            </Grid>
                        </ControlTemplate>
                    </Setter.Value>
                </Setter>
            </Style>
        </Grid.Resources>
        <StackPanel Margin="4" HorizontalAlignment="Left">
            <RepeatButton Width="200" Height="22" Click="Up_Click">
                <Polygon Points="5,0 10,10 0,10 5,0" Fill="#222222" />
            </RepeatButton>
            <ListBox x:Name="listbox" Width="200" Height="150" Style="{StaticResource ListBoxStyle1}">
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 1" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 2" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 3" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 4" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 5" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 6" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 7" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 8" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 9" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 10" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 11" />
                <ListBoxItem Content="Item 12" />
            </ListBox>
            <RepeatButton Width="200" Height="22" Click="Down_Click">
                <Polygon Points="5,10 10,0 0,0 5,10" Fill="#222222" />
            </RepeatButton>
        </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

In XAML, just apply the custom style and populate it with some test data.  There are also two repeat buttons, an up and down that will handle the scrolling for us:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Documents;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Media.Animation;
using System.Windows.Shapes;

namespace CustomListBox
{
    public partial class Page : UserControl
    {
        public Page()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Up_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (listbox.Items.Count > 0)
            {
                int newIndex = listbox.SelectedIndex - 1;

                if (newIndex < 0)
                {
                    newIndex = 0;
                }
                listbox.SelectedIndex = newIndex;
            }
        }

        private void Down_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (listbox.Items.Count > 1)
            {
                int newIndex = listbox.SelectedIndex + 1;

                if (newIndex >= listbox.Items.Count)
                {
                    newIndex = listbox.Items.Count - 1;
                }
                listbox.SelectedIndex = newIndex;
            }
        }
    }
}

And now we're done!

HostForLIFE.eu Silverlight 6 Hosting
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About HostForLIFE.eu

HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

We have offered the latest Windows 2016 Hosting, ASP.NET Core 2.2.1 Hosting, ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting and SQL 2017 Hosting.


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