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Silverlight 5 Hosting Germany - HostForLIFE.eu :: Using "ClickMode" Property for Button control in Silverlight

clock January 27, 2015 06:35 by author Peter

In this article let us see the distinctive methods for utilizing the property Clickmode for a Button Control in a Silverlight application. Of course, open the visual studio and select the Silverlight 5 project.

First let us drag 3 different Button and TextBlock controls to Stack Panel as shown below into MainPage.xaml. Here I utilized a property called "ClickMode" for all the three button controls, But the value assigned to it is diverse.

For the first button I allocated the quality Hover to the ClickMode property, It implies that the click event handler happens at whatever point the mouse is floated onto this button.

For the second button, I allocated the quality Press to the ClickMode property, It implies that the click occasion handler happens at whatever point the mouse is clicked on this catch.  For the third button I assigned the value Release to the ClickMode property, It implies that the click event handler happens at whatever point the mouse is discharged from this button.

<Button x:Name="btn1" Margin ="5" HorizontalAlignment="Left"
Foreground="Black" Width="320" Click="OnClick1"
Content="On Mouse Hover this text will appear below" ClickMode="Hover" />
<TextBlock x:Name="text1" Margin ="0,8,0,0" />
<Button x:Name="btn2" Margin ="5,5,5,5"  HorizontalAlignment="Left"
Foreground="Black" Width="320" Click="OnClick2"
Content="On Button Press this text will appear below" ClickMode="Press" />
<TextBlock x:Name="text2" Margin="0,8,0,0" />
<Button x:Name="btn3" Margin ="5,5,5,5" HorizontalAlignment="Left"           

Click="OnClick3" Width="320" Content="On Button Release this text will appear    below" ClickMode="Release"/>
<TextBlock x:Name="text3" Margin ="0,8,0,0" />

Now i am writing the code for button click events in the MainPage.xaml.cs
public MainPage()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }
        void OnClick1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            btn1.Foreground = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Blue);
            text1.Text = "On Mouse Hover this text will appear below.";
            text2.Text = "";
            text3.Text = "";
        }
        void OnClick2(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            btn2.Foreground = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Green);
            text1.Text = "";
            text2.Text = "On Button Press this text will appear below.";
            text3.Text = "";
        }
        void OnClick3(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            btn1.Foreground = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Green);
            btn2.Foreground = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Blue);
            text1.Text = "";
            text2.Text = "";
            text3.Text = "On Button Release this text will appear below.";
        }

Just refresh it. And here is the output.

Output for the first Button looks like:

Output for the second Button looks like:

Output for the third Button looks like: 

HostForLIFE.eu Silverlight 5 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes. We have customers from around the globe, spread across every continent. We serve the hosting needs of the business and professional, government and nonprofit, entertainment and personal use market segments.



HostForLIFE.eu Proudly Launches Sitefinity 7.3 Hosting

clock January 26, 2015 10:13 by author Peter

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European Recommended Windows and ASP.NET Spotlight Hosting Partner in Europe, HostForLIFE.eu, has announced the availability of new hosting plans that are optimized for the latest update of the Sitefinity 7.3 hosting technology.

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Sitefinity 7.3 is a Web Content and Experience Management Platform that enables business to engage, convert and retain customers through multiple channels. Sitefinity 7.3 is the only truly mobile web content management on the market that supports all three mobile strategies out of the box – responsive design, mobile apps and mobile sites.

Sitefinity 7.3’s intuitive user interface delights both developers and business users alike, making it a more efficient environment to get more work done faster. There’s no long training required, so even new non-technical users will be up and running in no time. Because it’s built on a modern code-base, Sitefinity is best equipped to meet the long term needs of today’s expanding businesses, including tackling challenges like mobile, ecommerce, multisite management, content personalization, and so much more.

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For more information about this new product, please visit http://hostforlife.eu/European-Sitefinity-73-Hosting

About HostForLIFE.eu :
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Silverlight 6 Hosting Spain - HostForLIFE.eu :: Create an Analog Clock application in Silverlight

clock January 20, 2015 07:20 by author Peter

Today, I will explain you how to create an analog clock apps in Silverlight 6. Of course open new projectin visual studio and select a Silverlight project. In Mainpage.xaml  draw an ellipse which will serve as background for our Analog clock. The code looks as following:

<Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
        <Ellipse Margin="165,67,145,83" Fill="Goldenrod" Width="330"
         Height="330" Opacity="0.7"/>
    </Grid>

Then, draw another ellipse in the same grid which will serve as Outer Rim for our analog clock. The Complete code looks on the below:
<Ellipse Height="330" Margin="156,58,154,92" Width="330" 
Stroke="Goldenrod">
            <Ellipse.Fill>
<LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.84,0.87" Opacity="0.9"  
StartPoint="0.164,0.129">
                    <GradientStop Color="Goldenrod"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Gold" Offset="0.7"/>
                </LinearGradientBrush>
            </Ellipse.Fill>
        </Ellipse>              


Next, I want to draw another ellipse in the same grid which will serve as Bevel for our analog clock. And this is the code that I used:
        <Ellipse Height="290" Margin="156,58,154,92" Width="290" Stroke="Goldenrod">
            <Ellipse.Fill>
                    <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.84,0.87" Opacity="0.5" StartPoint="0.164,0.129">
                    <GradientStop Color="Goldenrod"/>
                    <GradientStop Color="Goldenrod" Offset="0.987"/>
                </LinearGradientBrush>
            </Ellipse.Fill>
        </Ellipse>     

Now draw another ellipse in the same grid which will serve as a Face for our analog clock. This is the code snippet:
<Ellipse Height="270" Margin="176,78,174,112" Width="270"
         Stroke="Goldenrod" Fill="Yellow" Opacity="0.3"/>

Now we are going to draw the hour,minute and seconds hand. Then draw a rectangle in the same grid which will serve as a Hour hand for our analog clock with the code below:
<Rectangle x:Name="hourHand" Height="59" Margin="315.75,180,314.25,0"
        VerticalAlignment="Top" Fill="Black" Stroke="Black" Width="10" RenderTransformOrigin="0.525,1.428">
            <Rectangle.RenderTransform>
                <RotateTransform x:Name="hourHandAnimation"/>
            </Rectangle.RenderTransform>
        </Rectangle>


Now draw another rectangle in the same grid which will serve as a Minute hand for our analog clock. And this is the code that I used:
<Rectangle x:Name="minuteHand" Height="80" Margin="316.75,160,315.25,0"       
VerticalAlignment="Top" Fill="Black" Stroke="Black" Width="8"
        RenderTransformOrigin="0.5,1.312" >
            <Rectangle.RenderTransform>
                <RotateTransform x:Name="minuteHandAnimation"/>
            </Rectangle.RenderTransform>
        </Rectangle>

Now we are going to draw another rectangle in the same grid which will serve as a Seconds hand for our analog clock. And this is the code that I used:
<Rectangle Height="80" Margin="318.25,160,316.75,0"
        VerticalAlignment="Top" Fill="#FFFF0000" Stroke="#FF000000"
        Width="5" RenderTransformOrigin="0.10,1.312" >
            <Rectangle.RenderTransform>
                <RotateTransform x:Name="secondHandAnimation"/>
            </Rectangle.RenderTransform>
        </Rectangle>

Now, our design part is complete. Now we have to give animations to our hour, minute and second’s hands. For this, let us take a storyboard. We should write the code for storyboard outside the Grid.  The complete code for all the three animations is as follows.
<UserControl.Resources>
        <Storyboard x:Name="silverlightClock">
            <DoubleAnimation x:Name="hourAnimation"                            
                             Storyboard.TargetName="hourHandAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetProperty="Angle"
                             Duration="12:0:0" RepeatBehavior="Forever" To="360"/>          
            <DoubleAnimation x:Name="minuteAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetName="minuteHandAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetProperty="Angle"
                             Duration="1:0:0" RepeatBehavior="Forever"/>                                                                
            <DoubleAnimation x:Name="secondAnimation"                            
                             Storyboard.TargetName="secondHandAnimation"
                             Storyboard.TargetProperty="Angle"
                             Duration="0:1:0" RepeatBehavior="Forever"/>                                   
 </Storyboard>
 </UserControl.Resources>

Now we have to write the code for these 3 animations (hourAnimation, minuteAnimation  and secondAnimation ) in MainPage.xaml.cs. The code looks as follows.
private void startClock(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            System.DateTime currentTime = DateTime.Now;
double hourAngle = ((float)currentTime.Hour) / 12 * 360 +                 
currentTime.Minute/2;          
hourAnimation.From = hourAngle;
            hourAnimation.To = hourAngle + 360;         
           double minuteAngle = ((float)currentTime.Minute) / 60 * 360;
            minuteAnimation.From = minuteAngle;
            minuteAnimation.To=minuteAngle+360;
           double secondAngle = ((float)currentTime.Second) / 60 * 360;
            secondAnimation.From = secondAngle;
            secondAnimation.To = secondAngle + 360;
            silverlightClock.Begin();
        }                          

We need to call the method “startClock” in our grid control and assign it to “Loaded” property of the grid control. The code for this looks as follows.
  <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White" Loaded="startClock"> 
</Grid>


Finally! Our Analog clock is ready. Now you should refresh and see it.

HostForLIFE.eu Silverlight 6 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes. We have customers from around the globe, spread across every continent. We serve the hosting needs of the business and professional, government and nonprofit, entertainment and personal use market segments.



Silvelight 6 Hosting Germany - HostForLIFE.eu :: Using TextBox Control in Silverlight

clock January 13, 2015 07:02 by author Peter

TextBox is the basic input control for getting into data into the Silverlight 6 Application. TextBox is especially use full whenever the user wants to enter some inputs into our Silverlight application. the following points describe the various ways that of using a TextBox management in your application.

1. The fundamental way of using the TextBlock control is:

And the result looks like below:

2. Next step, if you need to have a horizontal scrollbar in your TextBox, then the code looks as follows:

And here is the output:

 

3. If you need to have a vertical scrollbar and wrap the text completely inside your TextBox, then this is the code that I used:

And this is the result of the code:


4. If you want to insert a Hardline break explicitly from the user into your TextBox, then the code looks as follows. We can do this in both XAML and C# code.

XAML Code:

C# Code:

Apart from these there are several alternative properties that you simply will use with the TextBox control in Silverlight Application.



Silverlight 5 Hosting France - HostForLIFE.eu :: Async Web Service Calls using Delegates in Silverlight

clock January 6, 2015 06:57 by author Peter

In this post, I've been using Web-Service brings in Silverlight for various years now in a group of different applications with the unwieldy async BeginGetResponse, callback, EndGetResponse syntax. It's all been working extraordinary, I joyfully have a layout for this and can bash any new service integrations pretty quickly and has not been getting in the way. For a straightforward Get request they look something like this:

public string server = "123.123.123.123";
public void GetExample()
{
    String url = "http://" + server + "/getexample";
    try
    {
        HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
        IAsyncResult result = null;
        result = request.BeginGetResponse(GetExampleCallback, request);
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
    }
}
void GetExampleCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
{
    var request = ar.AsyncState as HttpWebRequest;
    var response = request.EndGetResponse(ar) as HttpWebResponse;
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
    {
        string result = reader.ReadToEnd();
        // now do something with this
    }
}

Which is all great and I typically have some extra code here to callback to a representative which can then do something, for example, show the result nonconcurrently with the regular playing around of recovering this onto the GUI string using a BeginInvoke Dispatch.
It then gets somewhat more muddled when you need to make a post ask for and need to push the XML parameters in an alternate asynch BeginGetRequestStream capacity which means you're getting callback after callback.

Simple enough, these can be packaged into a class for every Webservice work and can utilize some templating to diminish the exertion, yet's regardless it really dull. I've remain faithful to it in light of the fact that it meets expectations, I have an example and normally its not all that much inconvenience and once done means I can concentrate on the other fascinating bits of the application.

What I thought of resembles this:
using System.Threading.Tasks;

public string server = "123.123.123.123";
public void GetExample2()
{
    String url = "http://" + server + "/getexample2";
    try  
 {
        HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
        IAsyncResult result = null;
        ManualResetEvent mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        result = request.BeginGetResponse((cb) =>
        {
            // Callback
            using (var response = request.EndGetResponse(cb) as HttpWebResponse)
            {
                using (var reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
                {
                }
            }
            mre.Set();
        }, request);
        mre.WaitOne();
  }
    catch (Exception)
    {
    }
}

Essentially this is to handle the offbeat nature. In the event that you run this in the debugger you can see the BeginGetResponse call being made. Waitone() which is the typical string stream of the operation. You can then see the debugger bounce move down to the callback. The mre.set then sets the stream to proceed in the fundamental string once the callback has completed.



About HostForLIFE.eu

HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

We have offered the latest Windows 2012 HostingASP.NET 4.5 HostingASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting, and SQL 2014 Hosting.

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